Jan 22, 2017

WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE OUI?


THIS ^ 
I often get these comments. Every time I am puzzled.

Now you guys know a few years ago, I realized that I have adopted the Japanese culture, got used to life here so much, changed so much that I felt it was odd to call myself Canadian, I feel more and more Japanese as time goes by, thus , I call myself Japanese.

BUT ASIDE FROM THAT.
Even if I didn't wanna call myself Japanese.

I WOULD STILL SAY WE!

We, if you don't understand English, is a inclusive word.
It means the speaker is included in what they are talking about.
It doesn't matter if I am saying
"in Japan we have lots of vending machines"
"in Japan we have to pay insurance"
"in Japan we don't have central heating"

or "in Japan we go to the temple on new years"

No matter which video it is not matter HOW LOGICALLY I AM INCLUDED

I get these triggered ppl on my comments lmfao.
Especially triggers my haters.

I got something to say to you people.
My English sucks bro, but shyttttt I understand that "we" is 100% correctly used. LMFAO.  You literally just complaining to get other people to hear you.


I don't live in another country.
My house is here bro
My job is here bro
Those grocery stores I walk outside to shop at??? guess where they are.
*troll buds in* "you teleport to Canada cuz u za Canadian ryttt"

Nope. I shop same place anyone else.
I do the same things as anyone else. I live in the same city as anyone else here (when talking about Tokyo).

I think I would never say "Ainu people we do this" cause that doesn't make sense, I aint Ainu.

"men in Japan we ~~~" Aint a bro, bro.

"in Kyuushuu we ~~~" Nope, don't live there.



And yeah, in the other way around, I say "they" when referring to Canada and stuff Canadians do, because I don't live there/Don't do that/Am not a part of that.

This isn't a nationality thing, or a Ethnically thing. It is simply a use of the English inclusive word "we" which connects the speaker to the topic or subject they are speaking about.

Yall up in here tellin me to learn better English.  *giigles*

6 comments:

  1. It's fine to use "we" but makes me cringe when you call yourself Japanese, it's going too far. If you had a lifestyle of a fish, than you mind as well identify as a fish with your logic

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol then you have issuses.
      I am Japanese.
      It is simple logic.
      You move to a country, you apply for citizenship, you change your whole life. You adapt to the culture. It would be foolish and obscene to call myself Canadian. And actually for the most part illegal. Its illegal to misidentify yourself in any official situation on your nationality. If I were to tell the Japanese officials I was Canadian, it would be a blatant lie.

      A fish is a animal.
      Fishes don't have nationalities.

      Japanese isn't a inanimate object, its a nationality and a culture.
      If you belong to that culture, yeah, that is what you are.

      Delete
  2. You're not japanese, you are a citizen of japan which does not make you japanese. I'm from Britain born and raised but I'm not English I'm asian on an application form in the enthicity section I can't say I'm English because I'm not that would be a lie. What you said was wrong you are a citizen of japan you are not japanese

    ReplyDelete
  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I somehow deleted my own comment lol. Anyways, it was just to point out that I think the reason you get those reactions is because it makes it sound like you're denying part of who you are (not saying you are, just that it sounds that way). We all have multiple layers of identity. One of those layers happens to be Canadian for you because you grew up there. I have several "nationalities" that are part of me now just because of my own history, my family, etc. I claim every single one of them and each one has contributed to make me who I am today. Then of course there's a piece of paper that says that I'm this or that, but that's just a piece of paper. Everyone who's grown with several cultures, either within the same country or in different countries, has to deal with the same thing. People think of identity as a big monolithic block and not as a bunch of different layers so they try to make others fit into one or another block. And so you spend your time having to defend how you feel about your own nationality against what others perceive. I get the question all the time whether I feel French, American or Spanish. But it's not either or. I feel, and I am, all three. Some people get angry at me for saying that because they think it's arrogant, as if I was saying I was superior to them, that I thought I was more then they were because they were "just" one nationality. But it's just a fact that I am all three of those things. They're all part of who I am. And I wouldn't say I'm only Spanish just because that's where I happen to live now. But that's just me. Everyone deals with identity in their own way I suppose.

      Delete